This piece was such a struggle. Some Foundlings come together so easily as if wanting to be created—others take months. In this work, the ruffled glass shade broke as I was tighteningthe last screw. I was heartbroken and I wrote about this mishap in a previous blog. I was able to get a second shade relatively quickly and yes, with the tightening of the last screw, I broke it… again. It took more then six months to get another shade and then it took several months more before I was brave enough to try to put this together again.

I am so relieved that I was able finish it. It was a frustrating process but worth it.

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A frame shop was going out of business and my friend Paul suggested that I stop by.
I do use a lot of frames in my work but, as always, the trick is trying to get them to “work” together… not to mention, fit together. With a broken brass frame that was unloved and ready to be thrown out, and two frames that almost fit, I had all of the ingredients for another Foundling.

Visiting another framer, Greg, from the Barnes Gallery in Garden City, helped me “adjust” the inner frame to fit. Greg’s skill and resources have been invaluable to me, and my Foundlings, more times then I can count. To both Greg and Paul, I say thank you.

 

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My sister died in 2008 and I was moved to make a memorial Foundling for her. I was pretty new to making Foundings at the time but this Foundling, although very special to me, never really seemed right. In reflecting on my sister’s sensibilities, I wanted this tribute to her to be more “involved”, more complex… more “pretty”. She would have wanted it that way.

Everything about this piece was more complicated then I had anticipated. For example, a picture of my sister in the last year of her life would show her slowing losing the battle with her Leukemia. A picture of her, taken only a year earlier would seem to ignore her struggle in her final year. I decided to use a picture of her in high school. This image would show her in a more idealized, youthful way. The way she would, no doubt, like to have been remembered. It was, afterall, her final wish… to be remembered. Here is the reworked Foundling that is a more fitting tribute to remember her by.

I’m still working at a fast pace as if, after being bottled up for six months, the creative energy is just pouring out. I am presently working on six pieces and the pace is yet another exercise in letting go. I am proceeding as if I was familiar with the road I am on and knowing which way to go. The process is not unlike sketching. I am less concerned planning the “aesthetic destination” and am more concerned with the journey. The trick is to stay loose and not get too concerned with having to be perfect.

I had a drawing teacher who once said to never be afraid of putting down the wrong line. It is only by putting down the wrong line that you know where the correct line goes. So working on six pieces allows me to not get too hung up on trying to be perfect and just enjoy the process,… and the pace.

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We moved back into the house after the renovation and I can now start setting up my new workshop/studio. I was never very handy,… especially with power tools so I never dreamed that I would have a studio like this (then again, I never thought that I would be making sculptures). I still won’t be able to create any pieces until I am unpacked, a process that could take weeks. Tools have to be cleaned up; boxes put away; and a gillion pieces of Foundling parts have to be sorted, cleaned and found a place for,… no small feat as I have no clue how I am going to orgainize all of this.

After six months I am looking forward to finally being able to get back to creating but before I do, I have another Art Expo New York / Solo show this week and I have to start to prepare for this in earnest. I am happy to have a better place to work with better light, heat and windows. I hope the Foundlings to come will be pleased as well.

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When I started making Foundlings, I was exploring many aesthetic directions (actually I still am). One direction was how illustrative to be. Did these works need to have a concept or theme behind them or were these to be purely aesthetic statements.

René and is one of my earliest Foundlings. Named after the artist René Magritte, making Foundings that were surrealistic had a certain appeal. In this work the bolts not only added texture to the background but are drilled through the branch to continue the pattern. My hope was to make the branch look almost transparent—to be there and yet not be completely there. To fool the eye and confuse the mind.

Over the years I have gone back and forth trying to decide if this piece is successful. Most times I think the answer is no. To be a “slave” to a concept takes away from my voice I seek in creating these. Perhaps, on the other hand, the concept was sound but the execution was not strong enough to compete with it.

Every once in a while, I will look at this piece and see the branch begin to look transparent. Every once in a while I look at this and see the long path that I have been on since its creation. And every once in a while I look at this and smile.

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This design, a circle enclosed in a square, has a long history behind it. From mandalas in the East to Leonardo di Vinci’s “Proportions of a Human Body” in the West.

I have been drawn to this form for as long as I can remember. Perhaps it’s the paradox of a circle and square living so comfortably together. Perhaps it’s the problem of squaring the circle, long proposed by Greek mathematicians, that has a special allure for me. Then again it may be nothing more then my love of contrasts.

I have returned to this form several times and I suspect, this won’t be the last time.

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I was pleased to find out that Gatekeeper just sold. Selling should not be a sign of “worth” or “approval” and yet, it would seem to me that the sincerest form of flattery is not imitation but selling. Someone may compliment a work but may not really “value it”. Some compliments come very easily or without any real conviction. If you are actually willing to pay for a work, the praise is not abstract. The worth is clear.

It does seem shallow to desire approval but this aspect of the creative process seems intrinsic to it. Art is about making a statement. Art is about having an interaction between the work and the viewer. Sometimes the reaction is emotional, sometimes intellectual. Sometimes the reaction is a just response based on pure aesthetics and sometimes the reaction has a political or social aspect. Either way, that which evokes a reaction is worthy of being called art.

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Between the holidays and our house renovation project, I have not made any blog entries since mid December. And, as mentioned in a prior blog, I have not worked on Foundlings for months now. It is a feeling not unlike traveling. The familiar routine of working in the studio is gone replaced by daily new distractions. I am a creature of habit but I do try to let go. Let go of habits, let go of routines and let go of expectations. Sometimes I am successful, other times, not. So I am exloring what it’s like not to create. I will not get to do any work until I can get back to my workspace, even though I have another Art Expo coming up in April.

That is not to say that I have not been creative. In the midst of the renovation I have designed another stained glass window for our home. It will probably take a year or so to create (I design the window and a talented stained glass artist, Laura Carbone actually builds it). Choosing a rather complex type of flower, a pair of irises, I am not sure how this will come off in glass but like any process, it will have to unfold.

I do hope to get back to the workshop, amongst a sea of plaster dust by March. With luck I will have a month or so to create a piece or two for this year’s Expo.

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Douglas, a dear friend of mine, gets me such worderful parts to put in my Foundlings. Often I wonder if he has such a good eye and truely understands what I look for or if he just sees something wierd and assumes that I would like it. Whatever the reason, he found a wonderful door knocker that I used in a piece. The knocker was just beautiful.

After I was done puting this Foundling together, I just wasn’t happy with the work. I was so sure in building this piece that it would “work” and yet, after completing it, I was never completely happy. So it sat in my workshop for months, not quite completed and not quite sure what to do about it.

Much later, perhaps many months later, another friend mentioned that a frame shop was going out of business and I was able to buy a lot of frames, some whole, some broken. One frame was casually put down on my workbench when I suddenly looked up and saw the uncompleted Foundling, hanging, just waiting for something that might finish it. I took down the Foundling and casually laid it on top of the frame. That did it. I’d like to say that I planned this but no, just fate. Adding keys to go with the door knocker, added the finishing touch.